Apr 182015
 

Today we have added another three patrol reports to the site.

Godshill Auxiliary Unit Patrol – Isle Of Wight

Rora/Longside Auxiliary Unit Patrol – Aberdeenshire

Crimond Auxiliary Unit Patrol – Aberdeenshire

They are just basic reports that include names of the Auxilier’s but we have found that this normally means that members of the public and their relatives help us fill in the gaps.

Feb 242015
 

Symondsbury Auxiliary Unit 1We have added four more patrol reports to Group 6 in Dorset thanks to the hard work of our Dorset CIO Dr. Will Ward with help from Martyn Allen & others.

These are Symondsbury, Morcombelake, Shipton Gorge and Whitchurch Canonicorum.

You can view them here. 

Can you help with any additional info? We would love to hear from you. 

Jun 292014
 

BirthdayToday is CART’s (Coleshill Auxiliary Research Team) fifth birthday.

We have been researching the Auxiliary Units (British Resistance) for five years.

The website was started on 29th June 2009 by Tom Sykes after a visit to the GHQ at Coleshill.

Tom had no idea that there were others around the country interested in the subject and soon a group was formed.

The main strength of CART is that we share our findings. We believe strongly in being open and transparent and share all our findings with each other and the world in a free way.

CART’s CIO’s (Researchers) all share this ethos and this is how we have been able to grow so quickly, that and many hundreds of hours of volunteer time in records offices and romping through the countryside looking for Operational Bases.

The British Resistance Archive is the result of all this hard work, much of which has never been discovered before.

Thank you to all our Friends, Supporters and followers for all your help and financial aid.

Here’s to another 5 years!!!!

Mar 232014
 

John MarchantWe have added some information on the New Forest Scout Section thanks to Dr Will Ward our Dorset CIO.

John Marchant was the commander of the Scout Section for the New Forest in West Hampshire from approximately March 1942 to October 1943.

He had been commissioned at 20 years of age into the Wiltshire Regiment in April 1940 and spent the early part of the war training recruits at the depot in Devizes, Wiltshire. Rather bored, he jumped at the offer from his CO to be posted to alternate duties and found himself at Burley, with a unit of 15 men from the Wiltshire regiment, including a Sergeant and Corporal with the rest as Privates. They weren’t local men, but ordinary soldiers recruited from the depot. This was the New Forest Scout Section.

Read more here

Dec 172013
 

Research has uncovered that the Western Morning News, a local paper in the Devon area, exposed and outed the Auxiliary Units just 17 months after they had been stood down!

Western Morning News 1945

Just one month later the same paper published an interview by an un-named Auxilier (see below). This is fairly shocking as nearly all Auxiliers signed the Official Secrets Act which prevented them from speaking to anyone about their role, needless to say some took this more seriously than others.

The general secrecy of Aux Units during the war varied around the country with some counties being far more relaxed than others.

Western Morning News Aux Interview

But this was not the first public exposure.

In April 1945 The Times on Saturday published an article called ‘A Britain’s Secret “Underground” Invasion Spy Force Stood Down’.

times1

If you know of any other press from this time that talks about the British Resistance please do let us know.

Oct 172013
 

126-thickbox_defaultOur Aux Silicone Wristband has now gone on sale in our shop. It is the first design in a set of two.

They provide a versatile and discreet way of being able to display your support of our research work all year round.

This design displays our logo and website address. It is black silicone and measures 202mm long x 12mm wide and x 2mm thick.

The next design will be just Auxiliary Units and is white. It will be available to buy soon.

You can buy yours here 

Oct 092013
 

We have plotted all the known Auxiliary Unit patrols and their bases and added them to our site. 

MapFor the first time a map showing the regional breakdown of all known patrols, operational bases and observation posts of the secret British resistance is available to the public.

We have gathered our comprehensive records and patrol reports to plot all the known groups across the UK.

We felt that the clearest way for the public to identify patrols of interest to them was to plot them onto an interactive map.

The highly secret nature of the units means that it is highly unlikely that a map with this much detail has ever existed – so it really is a very special resource indeed.

The map shows all those patrols we currently know about, but we are getting in new information all of the time.

If anyone has further information about the identified patrols, or believes that there are some locations missing, then we would urge them to come forward!

We plan to update all the county pages with a smaller regional map in the near future.

Aug 172012
 

An unknown Operational Base marks the end of CART’s published research for Suffolk Auxiliary Unit Patrols.

CART researchers believe they have uncovered all the known patrols in the county and now hope the public can help fill in any last pieces.

You can read the report on this OB here

Jun 072012
 

Norwich Zero Station – Many 0f our researchers believe this to be the most significant ‘find’ in terms of research into the Special Duties Section in the last decade.

In the spring of 2012, we were contacted by a retired grounds man who informed us about the existence of a secret WWII ‘bunker’ and a meeting was arranged within the same week.

Armed with spades, shovels, a crow bar, and a metal detector we met the owners’ development manager at the site. What we found left us quite breathless (in more than one way)

The property owners acted swiftly and with great responsibility in that the in-house surveyors as well as Norfolk County archaeologists were informed within hours. Furthermore, thanks to the owners’ generosity and trust we were the first to carry out a detailed survey before anyone else came on site, and for this we are immensely grateful. Bound by our promise not to talk about what we had seen, we quietly continued our research and we produced a report to be used for guidance by all concerned – knowing that nobody would be familiar with what they would be seeing, and that for this reason not only would many small details go unnoticed but, more importantly, the importance of this find might not be fully understood. Nowhere in the UK was there another Zero-station in a similar state of preservation and with so many original features still in place. Consequently, we suggested that the structure is of national importance and that it should for this reason be preserved in its entirety.

In due course, the Norfolk County archaeologists requested our presence when conducting their own assessment – needless to say that we were very pleased to be invited to meet them. To our great delight, they unanimously decided on the spot to involve National Heritage, resulting in the Zero station being declared a Scheduled Monument of national importance. Our report now forms part of the archaeological survey of the site.

Our thanks go to the landowner and the hard work Evelyn and Adrian have put in to producing this report.

See the full exclusive report here

 

 

May 202012
 

We have added the Wickham Market/Little Glemham Auxiliary Unit Patrol to the site.

The team used the codename of ‘Thrush’.

The full report by our Norfolk and Suffolk CIO’s can be seen here.